Native American Heritage Month Speaker Series

The Arkansas Archeological Society is honoring Native American Heritage Month by sponsoring a series of online Zoom lectures by Native American guest speakers. The lectures are open to the public, but interested individuals should register in advance for each meeting (see our attached flyer).

2021 AAS Ballot for new Officers and Board of Advisors

The AAS is now conducting its annual vote for new Officers and Board of Advisors. Members with an email on file will receive a ballot email link using freeonlinesurveys.com to cast their ballot. Other members will receive a ballot via regular mail.  All ballots must be received by November 19th, 2021.

New logo

New Logo Announcement – 2017

Hester

Scholarships Available

Society Member Receives Lifetime Achievement Award

Connaway

Arkansas Archeological Society member John Connaway received a prestigious award at the Southeastern Archaeological Conference in Tulsa earlier this month. John is an archeologist with the Mississippi Department of Archives and History. SEAC presented him with a Lifetime Achievement Award. The following testimonial accompanied the presentation. Congratulations!

“The second archaeologist we will honor tonight is John Connaway who is entering his 51st year working for the Mississippi Department of Archives and History. He has spent that time working out of the Clarksdale office and has done more work in the Yazoo Basin than any other single archaeologist. Many of the sites he has salvaged, Oliver, Austin, and Carson to name three of the most important, were threatened by modern agricultural practices. In all three of these examples, he mobilized a crew of volunteers including academic archaeologists, graduate students, avocational archaeologists, and field schools to conduct a remarkable amount of archaeology on a very small budget. When his volunteers can’t make it, he works alone. The resultant collections of carefully curated artifact assemblages and meticulous fieldnotes have provided material for two or three generations of graduate student theses. There are few archaeologists who know their region as well as John and nobody who is better at shovel shaving.”